How to Build a Launch Team

How to Build a Launch Team

Anticipation is a powerful tool in the church planter’s toolbox. Anticipation about what God is going to do. Anticipation about how the church is going to grow. Anticipation about what that first service will be like when the launch preparations finally come into fruition. Anticipation about the lives that will be impacted by the gospel and the love of the people in this new church. Anticipation is powerful. But churches that don’t build a proper launch team never get to experience the benefits of anticipation. Here are two common mistakes church planters make: Launch with a handful of people in a living room. If that worked for Bill Hybels and Rick Warren, it’ll work for me.Truth: Nope. It most likely won’t. Hybels and Warren are outliers from a past generation. Decades of evidence and research consistently shows that churches with a launch team of under fifty people will struggle to ever gain viability, sustainability, and momentum. Could your church be successful launching with a couple of families? Absolutely. But why risk it when the benefits of building a launch team extend beyond viability, sustainability, and momentum? Build a decent launch team but rely on advertising to bring in launch day guests.Truth: Far too many dollars have been wasted on direct mailers and billboards by new church plants. I won’t waste your time trying to discourage you from using these means. If you believe they work, I can’t stop you. What I can tell you is that they’re extremely expensive, and when it comes to church planting, every dollar counts. A person who visits based on a direct mailer is less likely...
The Church’s Guide to Facebook

The Church’s Guide to Facebook

I’ve met with lots of churches over the years to talk about expanding their digital platform. One of the biggest questions I get is: “How can we use Facebook to help our church?” Like any other communication tool a church uses, from a Sunday bulletin to mailer to a newsletter, a church has to answer one critical question before even getting started utilizing Facebook to help the church: What is your church’s reason for having a Facebook page? This seems like a simple enough question, but how leaders answer this question will impact the conscious and subconscious choices your church will make in how this social media platform will get used. Though answers may vary from church to church (and should), let me begin by making a suggested list of goals. Three valuable social media objectives: To communicate timely information to the congregation about events, services, and content. To provide a window into the personality of your church to newcomers and outsiders. To develop a sense of digital community through the sharing of encouragement, ideas, and content. If your church simply has the goal of having an active Facebook page “because we want to be relevant,” that page is doomed to be forgotten. Conversely, if your staff and leadership chooses to be intentional about your social media presence with clear goals, Facebook provides unparalleled visibility and instant connection with people inside and outside your church. In light of the goals stated above, here are the four types of updates your church should post: Reminders for events, sign-ups, time-changes, etc. This is the easiest and most obvious kind of post. Whenever...